Tamworth Community Presbyterian Church Experiencing Christ In Community

Sermons

Daniel 11:1-12:13

The short movie I’m about to show portrays the devil asking for proof of God’s love. The core of our faith is in God’s love. When we’re asked to defend our belief in that love, in the face of constant turmoil, do we have an answer that will quiet the voice of doubt and give us a firm foundation to stand on?

“Prove it to me” (The Skit Guys)  

Daniel constantly lived with the challenge of living for God in the ordinary moment of life.  So as we come to the end of our series on Daniel today we see the book ends as Daniel comes across what is to occur in the future.  These are things of Intrigues, battles, conquest, of Kings who exalt themselves as they defeat and rule over other nations.  For Daniel it gets at the heart of how do you live out a life of faith; with our eyes squarely on God, when the pressure is on, and the times are tough, or when people seek to do us harm because our hope is in the Lord.  One thing we know of Daniel he is the man who knows how to trust in the Lord in the face of adversity.  He has known the life of a captive, exiled from Jerusalem and faced down evil plots to take his life.  He has been to evil kings with whom he is the messenger of God’s judgement.  Daniel led a life of prayer, which led him to face down hungry lions.  He even had to face up to these visions and dreams of what is to come.  Look back in Daniel 7 of those 4 horrible beasts come out of a chaotic sea, an evil, ugly image, with what looks like all creation bent on destruction, and total chaos and evil running amok in the world.  Or come across to the Ram & the goat of Daniel 8, which are images of empires overtaking other empires, each seeking world domination.  Daniel’s reaction to all of this was natural

7:28 28 “This is the end of the matter. I, Daniel, was deeply troubled by my thoughts, and my face turned pale, but I kept the matter to myself.”

8:27 27 I, Daniel, was worn out. I lay exhausted for several days. Then I got up and went about the king’s business. I was appalled by the vision; it was beyond understanding.

Finally receiving strength by being touched by God’s messenger Daniel 10:18-19: 18 Again the one who looked like a man touched me and gave me strength. 19 “Do not be afraid, you who are highly esteemed,” he said. “Peace! Be strong now; be strong.” When he spoke to me, I was strengthened and said, “Speak, my lord, since you have given me strength.”

Now as this book come to an end we are reminded to end with hope.  As Daniel is given a picture of the process and the end of history, we keep on being reminded that God works in mysterious ways.  As we read in Daniel 11:36-37

36 “The king will do as he pleases. He will exalt and magnify himself above every god and will say unheard-of things against the God of gods. He will be successful until the time of wrath is completed, for what has been determined must take place. 37 He will show no regard for the gods of his ancestors or for the one desired by women, nor will he regard any god, but will exalt himself above them all. 

It’s the nature of kings not to recognise how often in their quest for power, as they can become so focused on defeating their enemies.  That is powerful kings often they can’t see their enemy within.  Or notice how they always aspire to that one final victory that always proves to be elusive.  How these kings seek marriage alliances but fail; or use of force and fail.  These kings may win famous victories again these turn out to be only temporary.  We start getting an overview of history.  It is a pattern we see repeated time and time again as Daniel’s vision’s are of events to come.  As we’ve seen before Persia & Greece are mentioned by name.  As we sweep through the details of Daniel 11 & 12 we can see looking back in history of how the details line up with what happens after the death of Alexander the Great and how under Antiochus Epiphanes as he sweeps through Palestine into Egypt.  Antiochus entered into a marriage alliance by betrothing his daughter to the king of the south Ptolemy V of Egypt.  After over extending himself too far he is crushed by the Roman war machine, which ends with Antiochus’s assassination

 

Daniel saw what was to come, as there is also a sense in which Daniel is shown far beyond that, of something of the unknown future, that up until the moment of the last time when Christ will return.  What we know is that this there isn’t a list of events we tick off to predict that date.  What we are warned of instead is what to expect here; that things will get worse if we follow Christ

following Jesus as his disciple will be costly.  To follow Jesus will cost personally, financially, relationally, so we are told to count the cost.  Then in Daniel 12 it all changes gears again, verses 1-3

1“At that time Michael, the great prince who protects your people, will arise. There will be a time of distress such as has not happened from the beginning of nations until then. But at that time your people—everyone whose name is found written in the book—will be delivered.Multitudes who sleep in the dust of the earth will awake: some to everlasting life, others to shame and everlasting contempt. Those who are wise will shine like the brightness of the heavens, and those who lead many to righteousness, like the stars for ever and ever. 

Daniel is emphatic death cannot be the end.  God will not permit life to end with the grave and he will raise the dead and what Daniel saw and experienced was incomplete, obscure.  He sees the dead rising after a specific conflict, and his eyes are drawn to see that in death God has supremacy; as for us in Christ we know that Jesus is the one who has conquered sin and death.  God is up to something good for his glory[1]  We are also drawn into the reality of spiritual warfare that evil has entered our world by demonic and human agents, who are against God and seek to overthrow him and his purpose and how these demonic agents set themselves against those who seek to live for God in very ordinary moments of life, that’s where temptations come.  It is as if here God wants to draw us big pictures and shout loudly as if we are hard of hearing[2]

 

With all of these visions of the future, of the things that have not yet occurred for Daniel, and now for us as we await the return of Jesus, we are drawn even closer to the present.  We are called on to consider how we are doing today in our walk with God.  How we are dealing with the temptations to be like others?   Are we tempted to plunge headlong into life led by just doing what we want, instead of living life with the guard rails God puts in place for our well being.  The promise of Jesus is clear in Revelation 22:12-15 (The Message)

12-13 “Yes, I’m on my way! I’ll be there soon! I’m bringing my payroll with me. I’ll pay all people in full for their life’s work. I’m A to Z, the First and the Final, Beginning and Conclusion. 14-15 “How blessed are those who wash their robes! The Tree of Life is theirs for good, and they’ll walk through the gates to the City. But outside for good are the filthy curs: sorcerers, fornicators, murderers, idolaters—all who love and live lies.

Or Hebrews 13:5-6

Keep your lives free from the love of money and be content with what you have, because God has said, “Never will I leave you; never will I forsake you.” So we say with confidence, “The Lord is my helper; I will not be afraid. What can mere mortals do to me?”

The vision is clear of the future in the sure and certain victory of Jesus as his death on the cross brought victory over sin and death; and his promised return means we are to get on with living life now, so that we are given every encouragement to persevere in the face of opposition, suffering or persecution, all because we are untied with the one who overcomes.  This is why Daniel at the end is encouraged with hope by Daniel 12:13

13 “As for you, go your way till the end. You will rest, and then at the end of the days you will rise to receive your allotted inheritance.”

We are reminded to be about the ordinary day with God in view.  A reminder that God has the end of things in hand, so we can get on with living our lives today.  We can live with our lives fixed on Jesus and can be looking to see our lives changed and shaped to being more like Jesus in those parts of our lives the messy parts, the parts that make us proud, our dreams, hopes and aspirations.  That is our lives given over to God for him to do his will in us.  That is what Daniel learnt with all he saw and did.  He knew that in everything he needed to humble his heart and get on his knees and seek the Lord’s strength to go about his ordinary day.

 

Let’s pray…

 

David Hassan @ Tamworth Community Presbyterian Church 10-12-17

 

 

[1] Ideas taken from Reid, Andrew Kingdoms in conflict, Sydney, Australia, AIO, 1993, p222, 223

[2] Idea take from Dr Michael R. Emlet. CCEF subject Biblical Interpretation. Course Notebook.  p.27

Daniel 10:1-11:1

Finding the “Hope that motivates faithfulness” coming from God and not from us is where we find ourselves today in Daniel 10.  One of our challenges is that we have to hold in tension, what Daniel sees as a vision, with what Daniel sees unpacked in Daniel 11 & 12 we’ll cover that next week.  I wonder what sticks out most as you see Daniel 10 what comes to the fore?  Part of that has to do with Daniel’s character, and how he was known. What have we seen of who Daniel is so far? He is known for: his integrity; he is known as an exile from Jerusalem who has time and time again proved that his body might be captive but his identity is found in God; he is known for his life of faith; and finally he is known as a man of prayer.  What would you do if all of sudden today you had a messenger from God turn up and speak with you.  What would they say you were most known for?  In what way do you think you would stand out, as another thing Daniel 10-12 keeps pointing us back to Daniel 8.  This is when Daniel has a vision of the Ram & the goat and the goat over powers the Ram.  What we keep on being reminded of is the war waged is as much a spiritual one as it one seen in the conquest of nations by great armies.  In Daniel there is something much larger going on; just as we don’t have to be told how much temptation we face as we seek to live each day as a disciple of Jesus.  How we struggle to live a practical life of faith is shown by the question of how willing I am to forgive others? Another question is where I find my refuge in times of trouble? Or where I take courage form in the face of evil?  At the end of the day will for us Jesus be enough.  As we read in Daniel 10:1

In the third year of Cyrus king of Persia, a revelation was given to Daniel (who was called Belteshazzar). Its message was true and it concerned a great war.  The understanding of the message came to him in a vision.

Daniel 9:1-27

What did you dream you would be when you grew up when you were younger?  Was it the big six: teacher, actor, astronaut, firefighter, chef, or ballerina.  How many of us reached that dream?  Sometimes we find the reality not what we dreamt it would be, so we reached for something else.  I don’t think Daniel in all his wildest dreams, would ever have thought he would be a Babylonian Wise man, now in a position of great power, a co-ruler over large expansive empire.  This is where we find ourselves today in Daniel 9.  Again, Daniel is being flooded with a sense of the reality of life, not as he would wish it or like it to be.  Daniel was a realist about himself, the nature of those he knew and loved.  It is why I think we find Daniel so often at prayer.  Today we get a chance to look over his shoulder, getting the inside scoop on what exactly Daniel prays about. He starts by getting his soul oriented before God.  Verse 4-6

I prayed to the Lord my God and confessed: “Lord, the great and awesome God, who keeps his covenant of love with those who love him and keep his commandments, we have sinned and done wrong. We have been wicked and have rebelled; we have turned away from your commands and laws. We have not listened to your servants the prophets, who spoke in your name to our kings, our princes and our ancestors, and to all the people of the land.

Daniel 8:1-27

Are you someone who likes solving mysteries? When you watch one of those detective shows on TV are you the one whose usually worked it all out before anyone else has?  When you come across something like a word or an idea you’ve never understood before, do you reach for Google to find out something more about it? Or Like those cryptic crosswords, where we’re given clues to guess what the word is.  Sand Balfour of The guardian Newspaper gives these tips if you want to get better at solving them “…what no one ever tells you is this: the answer is right in front of you – by definition. Every crossword clue contains a definition of the answer you're looking for. All you have to do is find it . .

  1. Read the clue. Then read it backwards. 2.Think about the rest of the clue. The part of the clue that is not the definition is known as the subsidiary indicator.  3. Harden your heart against the setter's siren charms.  4. Repeat step three.  5. Look at the number of letters. Ten-letter solutions are longer than five-letter solutions. I know it sounds obvious, but it should shape your thinking. A 10-word clue for a three-letter solution should alert you to something.[1]

Sometimes these chapters from Daniel can feel like we’re trying to solve a cryptic crossword about a ram with 2 horns and a goat with one horn between its eyes that charges the ram and tramples it underfoot.  This is where we find ourselves this morning in Daniel 8 as Daniel is presented with another vision while seeing the end in sight.  We are swept up with these images that are meant to be capturing us as a picture book, not a puzzle book.  Daniel 8 grabs our attention about the reality of spiritual warfare.  It is not something we will totally figure out or that we will understand all of it.  As we read in Daniel 8:1-4

Daniel 7:1-28

How do you imagine the end of the world to come? At the height of the cold war we might have imagine a big Russian finger on the button that would lead to the annihilation of the world.  It is no wonder the American policy of nuclear weapons was called MAD (Mutually Assured Destruction).  The trouble was it wasn’t just America & Russia they were assuring the destruction of.  Maybe we’re now seeing the same fears played out in different ways, with all the terror attacks of IS, or countries like North Korea threatening and proliferating nuclear weapons, or Iran’s sabre rattling.  The End of time, the Apocalypse, can be just plain scary to think about.  This is where we find ourselves today in Daniel, seeing the end in sight

what Daniel saw so impacted him he wrote his reaction down verse 28

 28 "... I, Daniel, was deeply troubled by my thoughts, and my face turned pale, but I kept the matter to myself."

Daniel 6:1-28                           

Horatio Spafford, the writer of the hymn, “It is well with my soul.” In 1873 he waved goodbye to his wife, Anna, and their four children as they were bound for France aboard the ocean liner, Ville du Havre.  Spafford had some business affairs in the United States to tend to before he could join his family in Europe.  The trip went along smoothly until sometime in the middle of the

night on November 22 the ship was rammed broadside by another vessel. The rushing waters separated Mrs. Spafford from the three oldest children. She still clutched her youngest child, Tannetta, as they were swept into the cold Atlantic. Suddenly, the child was torn from her grasp. Mrs. Spafford was later pulled unconscious from the water by sailors from the other vessel. All four children drowned. A few days later, Horatio received a telegram saying that only his wife survived.  Suffering with grief he boarded a ship to meet his wife in Europe.  At a certain point in the voyage, the captain announced that they were passing the site of the wreck.  Spafford went to his cabin and wrote the following poem.

 

When peace live a river, attendeth my way,

When sorrow like sea billows roll,

Whatever my lot, Thou hast taught me to say,

It is well, it is well with my soul.

Psalm 148-150

Bob Marley’s last words were “money can’t buy life”

Karl Marx last words were “Last words are for fools who haven’t said enough”

Groucho Marx last words were “This is no way to live!”

Humphrey Bogart’s were “I should never have switched from scotch to martinis”

Raphael, painter from the Italian Renaissance: last words were "Happy —" Apparently he didn’t get to finish his sentence

Leonard Nemoy  tweeted near the moment of his death “"A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. LLAP."  (LLAP was Nemoy’s short hand for Live long and prosper.[1])

 

All these examples are just like we see in the Bible with how a book finishes.  This shows us to keep thinking about it; just like today where we find ourselves in the Psalms.  The Psalms are a song book reaching into the depths of our emotions that bring us again and again to the right centre for life in giving God the glory, give God the best we have in praise.  The last word from the Psalms are “Praise the Lord”.  If you look back that last line starts back in Psalm 146.  Psalms 146-150 are all expressions on the same thing “Praise the Lord”.  Notice with me how each of them starts with Praise the Lord and then ends the same way “Praise the Lord”.  Like Psalm 1 started with Blessed is the man, the man who does not walk in the counsel of the wicked and it presented the choice of which path we will tread.  The question is what will we let capture our souls?  Will it either the path where the wicked, sinners and mockers of God find their rest? Or will we choose the path of life where the Lord watches over the way of the righteous?


Tamworth Community Presbyterian Church
EMAIL: minister@TCPC.org.au
PH: 02 6765 2865